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Posts tagged ‘research nurse’

Q&A: Research on the wards

Chris Lerpiniere*

Chris Lerpiniere (Image copyright: Chris Lerpiniere)

We know that clinical research relies on doctors and willing patients, but what about nurses? Chris Lerpiniere is a Senior Research Nurse on the MRC-funded RUSH, ‘Research to Understand Stroke due to Haemorrhage’ project at the University of Edinburgh. Here she tells Hazel Lambert about her work, and the route she took from clinical nursing to research.

How did you become a research nurse?

My nursing experience has been within neurosciences, critical care and tissue donation for transplant. Research has always been something I have had an interest in, particularly when you see the benefits and improvement to patient care brought about by research. However my career had followed a more clinical-based route until I saw the advert for the RUSH research nurse post and realised it was an opportunity to branch out into research.

What is the RUSH study aiming to do?

There are two types of stroke: one is caused by blockages in the blood supply to the brain (ischaemic), and the other is caused by bleeding in the brain (haemorrhagic). RUSH looks at what causes haemorrhagic strokes and the best way of treating them. I work on a part of the programme called the LINCHPIN (Lothian study of INtraCerebral Haemorrhage, Pathology, Imaging and Neurological outcome). Read more