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Posts tagged ‘Olympics’

Why I can’t wait for the Olympics to end

London 2012 Athletes' Village

Aerial view of the London 2012 Athletes’ Village (Image copyright: LOCOG)

St George’s University of London researcher Chris Owen explains how once the Olympics is over, the hard work on his physical activity study – part funded by the MRC – begins.

As someone who studies at a population level how much physical activity people do, I’m intrigued to see whether the sporting prowess on display at this year’s Olympic and Paralympic Games will inspire the country to move around a little more.

However, I can’t wait for the Olympics to end. That’s because once the athletes have gone home, and the Athletes’ Village changes its name to East Village, my work begins.

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The power of the phenome

London 2012 Anti-Doping Science Centre

London 2012 Anti-Doping Science Centre (Image copyright: GlaxoSmithKline)

Today Prime Minister David Cameron announces that the London 2012 Anti-Doping Science Centre in Harlow will live on after the Olympic Games as the MRC-NIHR Phenome Centre. Katherine Nightingale spoke to Frank Kelly, one of the principal investigators at the new centre and Director of the Analytical & Environmental Sciences Division at King’s College London, to find out what phenomes can teach us about disease.

Let’s start with the basics, what exactly is a phenome?

Well, lots of people have heard of the genome — it collectively describes an individual’s genetic material. The phenome describes all the other chemistry of our body; all the molecules in our body. This mixture of molecules changes every minute of every day and depends on the way we lead our lives, the environment in which we live and how our bodies respond.

How does studying phenomes help researchers understand disease?

When genomic science began we all thought that once we’d figured out human genomes we’d understand why some people get disease and some people don’t. But it turns out that our genomes only explain the causes of a fifth of chronic diseases like heart disease — in fact, environmental factors are behind the vast majority of chronic diseases.

By environment I mean the totality of environmental exposure, from the type of food we eat to where we live, the type of job we have, the level of stress we experience, the air we breathe, the water we drink, the chemicals we use to clean our homes. All of these in combination will lead to some people developing chronic disease at some point in their lives. Read more