Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘MRC Toxicology Unit’

From Israel to Canada, cancer to Huntington’s

Left: brain cells without HACE1 shrinking and dying, and right, cells high in HACE1.

Left: brain cells without HACE1 shrinking and dying, and right, cells high in HACE1.

When Barak Rotblat moved to Canada to start research into childhood cancers, he had no idea that it would lead to insights into Huntington’s disease, one of the most debilitating forms of neurodegeneration. Here he tells us why he’s glad he went against his initial instincts.

As my PhD at Tel Aviv University, Israel, was coming to an end, I was looking around for a lab in which to continue my training. My PhD was in the field of cell signalling ― studying how components within cells interact ― and I knew I wanted to stay in that field.

An opportunity came up with a researcher called Poul Sorensen at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. At first I was a bit reluctant. I was mainly interested in how proteins move around in cells, while Poul was a pathologist studying genes involved in childhood cancers. However, when I looked into the project a little closer, I realised that analysing the genes that go wrong in childhood cancers could lead to fundamental understanding of cellular processes that affect all cells.

A few months later I was getting on a plane to Canada. Read more