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Posts tagged ‘MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics’

Behind the picture: Metaphors of the mind

Frustrated by the lack of images to illustrate the mind, Dr Rhys Bevan-Jones, Clinical Research Fellow at the MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, decided to create his own. Here he describes the story behind this picture, where the worlds of psychiatry and art collide.

Illustration of representations of the mind

Copyright: Rhys Bevan-Jones

 

One of my friends once told me that he saw the mind as a senate. He described it as a place where the issues of the day are discussed by lots of little people and organised by the main debater in the middle. So that’s what I drew (see middle-right of the picture).

This gave me the idea of asking more people how they saw their mind, or different aspects of the mind. I received a variety of responses. My hairdresser, for example, sees the mind as a series of little post boxes (middle-bottom). There’s a little person who receives the messages – visual and auditory – inside the head. They post and categorise each of the messages into different post boxes, based on the emotional content. Read more

Redefining the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders

For world mental health day, Professor Sir Michael Owen, Director of the MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, describes how genetics is changing the way we study psychiatric disorders – and our approach to biomedical research as a whole.  

mike-owen-2016

Image copyright: Mike Owen

We’re learning more and more about the genetics and biology behind psychiatric disorders, and one of the things this is telling us is that we need better diagnostic approaches.

In psychiatry we use diagnostic categories such as ‘schizophrenia’, based on clinical knowledge, to define sets of signs and symptoms in the clinic. This gives us an idea of what course the condition will take and its outcome. But these categories need to be more precise so the advances in understanding can be translated into better treatments.

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A meeting of young minds

Discussing a poster (Credit: Eliot Bradshaw)

Delegates deep in discussion over a poster (Copyright: Eliot Bradshaw)

PhD student Kathryn Bowles is researching the role of cell signalling in Huntington’s disease at the MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics at Cardiff University. Frustrated by a lack of opportunity to get together and discuss neurodegenerative research with other early-career researchers, she took matters into her own hands and organised a symposium of her own.

As a student pipetting my way through the second year of my PhD, why on earth would I decide it’s a good idea to hold a national symposium for other early-careerscientists? To plump up my CV? To practise my already-impressive ‘to do’ list writing skills?

Admittedly, both of those were a factor. Most importantly though, I thought it was something that young scientists needed. Most conferences we go to are dominated by our supervisors and star ‘names’ in the field. We could do with the chance to discuss our work with our peers, without the intimidation of more senior scientists. Read more