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Posts tagged ‘microscopy’

Behind the picture: How fly eye cells get their shape

The main goal of the Pichaud lab at the MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology at University College London is to understand how fly eye cells get their shape. But why do fly eyes matter? And how can studying fruit fly eyes help us fight cancer in humans? Franck Pichaud and Rhian Walther explain all.

Image: Fruit fly photoreceptors imaged with confocal microscope. Copyright : Franck Pichaud Lab

Image: Fruit fly photoreceptors imaged with confocal microscope. Copyright : Franck Pichaud Lab

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What’s in a workspace? Brad Amos and his basement

This article was first published in the Spring edition of Network.

Microscope hackers

Today we announced funding for the Next Generation Optical Microscopy Initiative, a £25.5m investment from three research councils for scientists to create or house technology that pushes the boundaries of microscopy. They’ll be using the techniques to peer more closely at cells and the processes that bring about disease. Here we take a look at just one of the 17 projects, which aims to combine electron and light microscopy to image living cells in minute detail.

(Copyright: University of York)

(Copyright: University of York)

It might not look very pretty, but this grey image represents a step towards something of a holy grail for researchers. It’s an image of proteins within a cell taken with a combination of an electron and light microscope, a technique that scientists at the University of York and the Cancer Research UK (CR-UK) London Research Institute are about to take one step further and use on living cells. Read more