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Posts tagged ‘Medical Research Foundation’

What is the Medical Research Foundation?

Did you know that the MRC has an independent charity? While we are funded by taxpayers via Government, the Medical Research Foundation (MRF) is funded directly by charitable giving. Here Director Dr Angela Hind tells us about the MRF and its aims to fund early-career researchers at crucial points in their scientific lives.

The Medical Research Foundation is all about people: the people who choose to donate money, the people being helped by the medical research we fund, and the people whose careers we enhance by providing funds when they most need it.

A major part of our strategy is to fund the next generation of research leaders to tackle today’s research questions, improving human health and developing the careers of the most talented at the same time. Read more

A helping hand for hepatitis C treatment

HCV Research UK is collecting blood samples from 10,000 people with hepatitis C infection (Credit: Flickr/Chandra Marsono)

HCV Research UK is collecting blood samples from 10,000 people with hepatitis C infection (Credit: Flickr/Chandra Marsono)

How do we know who’ll respond to drugs for hepatitis C? And how can this guide treatment? John McLauchlan, Associate Director of the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, tells us about two large research projects that are aiming to find out and take us a step closer to tailored treatment for the disease.

Devastated, angry, confused. These are just some of the ways people feel when they find out they’re infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The virus is thought to be carried by as many as 180 million people across the world. There is no vaccine available and although treatment can be successful, it is often accompanied by unpleasant side effects which can lead to people stopping treatment before it’s worked.

Chronic infection with HCV can lead to liver disease, and a heavy burden is being put on healthcare services as rates of liver disease related to HCV, such as cirrhosis or liver cancer, rise. Trying to predict who will develop these serious life threatening diseases and who will respond to treatment is very difficult. Read more