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Posts tagged ‘interdisciplinary research’

Lessons on how to foster interdisciplinary research

As one of the first cross-council interdisciplinary initiatives, The Environmental and Social Ecology of Human Infectious Diseases Initiative (ESEI)* was developed to respond proactively to the global problem of potential pandemic, epidemic and emerging infectious diseases. Five years on, MRC Programme Manager Morven Roberts shares lessons learnt from the initiative about how to foster future waves of interdisciplinary research.

In the last five years, the Ebola, Zika and yellow fever outbreaks – as well as the critical challenge presented by antimicrobial resistance – have provided continued impetus for research to understand the drivers of emerging or re-emerging infections.

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To the Crick! Part 5: 100 years of tuberculosis research and 70,000 years of evolution

For our final post in the ‘To the Crick’ series, we hear from Luiz Pedro Carvalho. He’s moving from the site of what was the National Institute of Medical Research (NIMR) in Mill Hill to the new Francis Crick Institute building in King’s Cross. We find out about Luiz’s work, focused on tuberculosis (TB), and look back at over 100 years of MRC-funded TB research.

a side view of open-plan lab space inside the Crick

Open-plan lab spaces inside the Crick

“It’s a mixture of excitement and already missing the place,” says Luiz. Mill Hill was home to NIMR for most of its lifetime but activities there have nearly come to an end. The venerable institute is now part of the Francis Crick Institute.

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Tackling drug resistance, one context at a time

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Dr Helen Lambert. Photo credit: Helen Lambert

To tackle growing numbers of drug-resistant infections we can’t apply the same ideas to every situation. Dr Helen Lambert, Reader in Medical Anthropology at the University of Bristol, explains why tailoring our tactics to the local context is vital in the fight against antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

In many parts of the world you can buy antibiotics over the counter without a prescription. It’s a practical way to obtain life-saving drugs where quality medical care is inaccessible.

In Europe we might effectively slow the spread of drug-resistant infections by reducing antibiotic prescribing and stopping access to over-the-counter antibiotics. But that doesn’t mean it’s the best solution everywhere.  Read more