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Posts tagged ‘mental health’

Connecting with help

University of Manchester Clinical Psychologist and Senior Lecturer Dr Sandra Bucci tells us about a Smartphone app her team are developing for the self-management of psychosis, and how it could particularly help younger ‘digital natives’.

Dr Sandra Bucci, University of Manchester

Image credit: University of Manchester

 

Severe mental health problems such as schizophrenia affect 24 million people worldwide, with an estimated annual cost to society of nearly £12bn in England alone. People with psychosis tend to misinterpret or confuse what is going on around them. For example, they may experience hallucinations (in which they see or hear things that are not real), delusions (unusual beliefs not usually held by others) or confused thinking.

Connecting the disconnected

Feelings of isolation are common for people experiencing psychosis. Psychotic experiences usually begin to appear in adolescence and young adulthood – a critical time in life when we find our identity, complete our education and start out on our careers. Feeling disconnected from others during that time can have really serious knock-on effects, not only on the trajectory of the rest of your life but for your family, and for society more broadly.

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Mental health research: working it out together

One of the ways the MRC supports scientists in delivering world-leading research is by holding workshops where researchers can meet with our programme teams to discuss the MRC’s aims and ambitions for their area of work. As we prepare to publish our updated Strategy for Lifelong Mental Health Research, Dr Kathryn Adcock, the MRC’s Head of Neurosciences and Mental Health looks forward to the global mental health workshop coming in June.

Close-up of group of people in discussion while sitting at an office table

As with so much in life, the best ideas often emerge when we come together. It’s the meeting of minds that enables those ideas to grow, and dialogue and debate that nurtures those ideas, shaping the world of tomorrow.

This is especially true for research. The MRC fervently believes that the best research often comes about when researchers collaborate, irrespective of science area and increasingly, irrespective of geographical boundary.

Social media provides a terrific virtual way to bring scientists together, whether it’s announcing new programmes and research calls on twitter, or commenting at the foot of blog posts like this one. But as helpful as the virtual world can be, there’s nothing like face-to-face interaction. Read more

Mental health: United we stand, divided we fall

Developing better approaches to treating and preventing mental illness is one of the greatest challenges we face. But by sharing ideas and working together we can make progress, says Professor Sir Michael Owen, Director of the MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics at Cardiff University.

Prof Mike Owen

Prof Mike Owen

 

Mental health is never far from the headlines these days, and this is as it should be. One in four of us will suffer from some form of mental ill health in any given year. Mental illness affects people across the lifespan from children to the elderly, and the burden imposed on individuals and society is immense.

It is widely acknowledged that we need more investment in care provision, and research into the causes and prevention of mental ill health and into the development of new treatment approaches.

We need new thinking about care and treatment, causes and prevention. We also need to hear from a wide constituency, including those with direct or indirect personal experience of mental illness (virtually all of us), healthcare professionals and academics. Read more