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Posts from the ‘Opinion’ Category

A reflection on health inequalities

Last week the Academy of Medical Sciences published a report, Improving the health of the public in 2040’ Dr Vittal Katikireddi is an NHS Research Scotland Senior Clinical Research Fellow in the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit and was a member of the working group. He explains how a healthier society can only be achieved by making society fairer – and why the solution goes beyond anything medicine can do on its own.

Slow progress

Despite advances in medical technologies treatments and public health measures, we’ve made no progress in addressing health inequalities in the UK. For example, a boy born today in one of the most deprived areas of Glasgow can expect to live around 15 years less than someone born in one of the richest parts of the city. Read more

Beyond open: making your data accessible

Sense about Science have recently set up a new website to help people make sense of children’s heart surgery data; Joanne Thomas and Emily Jesper from the charity explain why and how they made that data make sense.

Two percentages are shown being weighed against each other with the headline 'NO!''

A higher survival rate does not mean a better hospital. © PRAIS2 website project team 2016

At Sense about Science, we strongly believe that patients and families should be involved in how medical research is conducted and communicated. So when Dr Christina Pagel asked us to help codevelop the Understanding Children’s Heart Surgery Outcomes website, and include people who need this information in the project, we didn’t hesitate. Read more

It’s time to recognise the benefits of medical data use

Using medical data may help improve public health services and help identify patterns of disease, which could lead to more effective practices for prevention. Our head of clinical ethics and data, Dr Jon Fistein, argues that we should say more about these benefits.

It is widely recognised that routinely-collected health data can be used to improve the healthcare provided to individuals and to communities. The US Institute of Medicine champions the ‘learning healthcare system’ in which routinely-collected data are used to drive better, more efficient medical practice and patient care. Indeed, many argue that such uses of data are the only ways to improve services, reduce waste and make health service provision sustainable.

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